#LTHEChat 178 Overcoming students’ fear of public speaking with guest host Dr Rob Grieve @robgrieve17

A fear of public speaking is common in the general population with a high percentage of people anxious and fearful to stand up and speak in public. Oral presentations and public speaking are an important aspect of the student experience in UK higher education. Many modules use presentations as a form of assessment, without fully acknowledging the fear that many students have in public speaking. There is evidence that some students have a fear of public speaking, but this is limited and not fully acknowledged in relation to the student experience. A survey on the impact of social anxiety on student learning and well-being of students from two UK universities, found that students reported that public speaking/presentations were associated with frequent social anxiety (Russell and Topham, 2012). A study of undergraduate students in the US found that 64% reported a fear of public speaking (Ferreira Marinho et al, 2017).  

We recently conducted a qualitative survey of public speaking fears of students attending our Stand up and be Heard (SUBH) library workshops (Grieve, et al, 2019). One of the key themes was that public speaking had a negative effect on university experience and that students main fear was of being judged. The survey clearly identified the specific fears students have when public speaking and provides clear evidence of the negative effect on some students and their higher education experience. 

Apart from student fears, it was found that 89% of them would appreciate public-speaking training and support as an addition to their curriculum (Ferreria Marnho et al, 2017). Further research indicates that first-year students who completed pre- and post-public speaking exercises, identified greater feelings of satisfaction and less fear, indecision and confusion in relation to public speaking and public speaking assessment (Nash et al, 2016).

My approach to public speaking, used in my SUBH workshops and recently published book Stand Up and Be Heard (Grieve, 2020) has primarily focussed on being an authentic public speaker and moved away from the common approach that focusses on style and perfection. The authentic public speaker approach seemed to resonate with students and staff and was reinforced by my less than perfect but authentic facilitation of the workshops. https://www.advance-he.ac.uk/news-and-views/stand-up-and-be-heard

In becoming an authentic public speaker, we focus on the following components namely: 

  • Being present in the moment
  • Be yourself
  • Vulnerability
  • Let go of perfectionism
  • A key point is that becoming an authentic public speaker does not happen overnight, it takes time and practice to implement. What does change very quickly, as we have found with many students is the realisation that striving for perfection and style over substance increases the public speaking fear level.

    The important take home message is that we as learning and teaching staff, need to recognise that public speaking and module assessed presentations can be a real challenge and impact negatively on some of our student’s university experience and mental health. In my experience and as identified by some of the evidence, we as universities need to support our students more comprehensively in public speaking, which is an integral component of the university student experience. 

    References:

    Grieve, R., Woodley, J., Hunt, S., McKay, A. and Lloyd, J. (2019) Student fear of public speaking in higher education: A qualitative survey. In: Advance HE Surveys Conference, Bristol, UK, 8th  May 2019.

    Grieve, R. (2020) Stand Up and Be Heard: Taking the Fear Out of Public Speaking at University (Student Success). London: SAGE Publications Ltd.

    Ferreira Marinho AC, Mesquita de Medeiros A, Côrtes Gama AC, Caldas Teixeira L. (2017) Fear of Public Speaking: Perception of College Students and Correlates. Journal of Voice, 31 (1), 127.e7-127.e11.

    Gregory Nash, Gail Crimmins & Florin Oprescu (2016) If first-year

    students are afraid of public speaking assessments what can teachers do to alleviate

    such anxiety?, Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 41 (4), pp 586-600.

    Russell, G, and Topham, P. (2012). The impact of social anxiety on student learning and well-being in higher education. Journal of Mental Health, 21 (4), pp 375-385.

    Rob Grieve Biography 

    Photograph of Rob Grieve

    Dr Rob Grieve is a senior lecturer in Physiotherapy at the University of the West of England and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (HEA). As a person with a mild stammer, he has faced many issues in public speaking which has led to an increased awareness of student fears of public speaking and resulted in the facilitation of university wide student support workshops. The authenticity approach advocated in his public speaking workshops, is central to his learning and teaching practice. He has conducted research and regularly presented at national learning and teaching conferences on student fear of public speaking.

    He recently published a book (SAGE Publishing), which had positive reviews from UK academics (see link)

    Stand Up and Be Heard Taking the Fear Out of Public Speaking at University

    https://uk.sagepub.com/en-gb/eur/stand-up-and-be-heard/book263335#reviews

    The Wakelet for this week’s chat is now available

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    #LTHEChat 177: The future of effective assessment: more than just a paperless prospect? With guest hosts Professor Sally Brown @ProfSallyBrown and @Unisteff

    Summary

    The future of assessment: more than just a paperless prospect? This #LTHE chat, led bySteffen Skovfoged and Sally Brown, will discuss questions based on how recent changes in practice we’ve brought about as a result of the Coronavirus crisis are likely to have a long term impact on, we hope, making the assessment of the future more authentic and fit-for-purpose. In particular, we will review how technologies alongside effective and positive curriculum and assessment design may lead to long lasting improvements in ensuring assessment is integral to learning.

    The future of effective assessment – more than just a paperless future?

    Recently, Jisc (2020) released their report on the Future of Assessment as part of their Education 4.0 vision to explore how emerging technology may change education. In the report, the contributors argue that universities and colleges should use technology to transform assessment by setting and following five principles of being more authentic, accessible, appropriately automated, continuous and secure. And as universities have in recent months have had to respond rapidly to Coronavirus conditions, now also seems a sensible point at which to rethink how we use assessment in the future. Having just made major changes to plans to deliver face-to-face, invigilated, time-constrained, unseen exams, do we really want to revert to former ways when the lockdown is over?

    Jisc’s five principles argue that future assessments should be:

    Authentic: they should prepare learners for whatever they are going to do next, meeting employer needs as well as testing knowledge, capabilities and skills in a more realistic, context-relevant and motivating way. As Bloxham and Boyd (2007, p.193) argue, ‘Being able to reproduce knowledge in a de-contextualised examination does not guarantee that knowledge can be used in a real-life setting’.

    Accessible: they must be designed throughout to be usable by everyone to the greatest possible extent, including those who have a long-term disability, a short-term injury or a mental health challenge. The challenges of such expectations of inclusivity when using technologies must be addressed at the design stage, rather than expecting reasonable adjustments later on in the process.

    Appropriately automated: approaches should ease teachers’ marking and feedback workload, and can potentially provide quicker, more detailed and more actionable feedback for students, so long as fit-for purpose principles (Race 2020) (purpose, methodologies, orientation, agency and timing), are integrated in new approaches.

    Continuous: assessments in the future must be rich in practice opportunities and reflect the fact that students today need to be capable of lifelong learning, to adapt to changes in the world of work and across their lives rather than succeeding in one-off high-stakes, high-stress exams. Incremental opportunities to learn though feedback within the assessment process are likely to ensure better learning.

    Secure: fostering sound academic integrity (Brown and Race, at press), ensuring that the right student is taking the right assessment and that the work they are submitting is their own and abides by the rules. Remote proctoring, whereby technologies can authenticate remote digital assessment candidates is one solution, as well as active restriction of software and other means of aids with specially designed “lockdown browser” technology installed on candidates own devices.

    But how can these principles be applied in practice? And what barriers are educators facing when trying to abide to some of the principles, and how do we overcome the barriers? Are students really craving digital forms of assessment (or do they understandably seek the comforts of former approaches) and can we provide it without compromising the positive interactions of pre-2020 teaching and learning approaches? It is too early to say how the recent Covid-19 crisis will affect current assessment practice, but change it must, and the speed of extant change is likely to be accelerated. Is it possible to prevent academic misconduct without compromising student privacy and integrity? It will be valuable to explore these questions in the #LTHEchat, and discuss how universities and colleges globally are responding, as well as considering what we can learn and apply across the board that will make for better assessment practices in the future.

    Using these principles as our departure point, this #LTHEchat will provoke, we hope, an inspiring hour of discussion, with opportunities to share our knowledge and practice as we try to work out how to advance the future of assessment. Guest hosts this week are Steffen Skovfoged from UNIwise, provider of the digital assessment platform WISEflow (with whom more than 100 institutions across Europe have used Uniwise to support their assessment, and they report that in the last two months the increase of online assessment has grown exponentially. He will be joined by #LTHEchat stalwart and passionate assessment afficionado, Sally Brown.

    Biographies:

    Steffen Skovfoged is Director at Uniwise, provider of the digital assessment platform WISEflow. Following a 15 year-long career in the Danish university sector, working his way up from student counselor to director of studies and development, he co-founded the company UNIwise as a spin-out from Aarhus University in 2012. Together with several colleagues from the university he headed out on a mission to help change the education sector from analog to digital, more aligned with today’s standards and the expectations of stakeholders, students, teachers and staff.

    Sally Brown is an Independent Consultant in Learning, Teaching and Assessment and Emerita Professor at Leeds Beckett University where she was, until 2010,
    Pro-Vice-Chancellor. She is also Visiting Professor at Edge Hill University and formerly at the Universities of Plymouth, Robert Gordon, South Wales and Liverpool John Moores and at Australian universities James Cook, Central Queensland and the Sunshine Coast. She holds Honorary Doctorates from the universities of Plymouth, Kingston, Bournemouth, Edinburgh Napier and Lincoln. She is a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy, a Staff and Educational Development Association (SEDA) Senior Fellow and a National Teaching Fellow.

    The Wakelet from this week’s chat is now available.

    References

    Bjerrum Nielsen, S. (2020) (blog) ’Preventing Academic Misconduct in digital exams using third-party programs’ https://uniwise.co.uk/blog/preventing-academic-misconduct-in-digital-exams-using-third-party-programs (accessed May 2020)

    Bjerrum Nielsen, S. et. al. (2020) (blog) ‘WISEcon 2019: Beyond the standard written exam’ https://uniwise.co.uk/blog/wisecon-2019-beyond-standard-written-exam (accessed May 2020)

    Bloxham, S. and Boyd, P. (2007) Developing Effective Assessment In Higher Education: A Practical Guide, McGraw-Hill Education (UK).

    Brown, S. and Race, P. (2020) ‘Using effective assessment and feedback to promote learning’ in Hunt, L. and Chalmers, D. University teaching in focus: A learning-centred approach. Routledge, at press.

    Brown, S. and Sambell, K (2020a) ‘Contingency planning: exploring rapid alternatives to face to face assessment’ Downloadable from https://sally-brown.net/2020/03/13/assessment-alternatives-at-a-time-of-university-closures/ (accessed May 2020)

    Brown, S. and Sambell, K (2020b) Fifty tips for replacements for time-constrained, invigilated on-site exams Downloadable from https://sally-brown.net/2020/04/02/kay-sambell-sally-brown-coronavirus-contingency-suggestions-for-replacing-on-site-exams/ (accessed May 2020)

    D’Arcy, Norma dot.net (blog), March 31, 2020. ‘Online Exam Proctoring’; https://darcynorman.net/2020/03/31/online-exam-proctoring/ (accessed May 2020)

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    #LTHEchat 176: How do students engage with learning technologies? With guest host Professor Momna Hejmadi @bssmvh

    The impact of covid has brought with it the potential to rethink, maybe radically, traditional pedagogies. However, the emergence and adoption of new technologies may not necessarily be used in a consistent manner across modules, courses and institutions. This diversity of teaching and learning situations in which learning technology might be used, coupled with the heterogeneous nature of the tools themselves, can also have a bearing on how we understand the impact of technology within education.

    A plethora of data (gathered through surveys or interventions) highlight the benefits of technology -enhanced learning, particularly the way in which they can facilitate student engagement both within and outside the classroom, but there is a lack of scholarly consensus on the impact of technology on student engagement with their learning. In this chat, I explore how we might define or differentiate different types of engagement with technology. For instance,

    1. Is academic engagement (time on task, completion of assignments) distinct from behavioural engagement (attendance in online forums) or cognitive engagement (strategies for learning, self-regulation)?
    2. Should emotional engagement (enjoyment, enthusiasm) be subsumed within affective engagement (a sense of belonging to an online group)?

    Biography

    Momna Hejmadi is a Professor of Bioscience Education & Technology, Department of Biology and Biochemistry, and Associate Dean in the Faculty of Science, University of Bath. She oversees the Faculty of Science’s undergraduate and postgraduate taught learning, teaching and student experience for the 7 departments within the faculty. She was awarded the UK National Teaching Fellowship (NTF) in 2015.

    Professor Momna Hejmadi

    Given the current gap in literature, Momna has a thematic analysis underway on student engagement with learning technology. In the meantime, the reviews by Christenson and Reschly 2019 might be of interest.

    Links: University of Bath, NTF

    Curation of the chat:

    The Wakelet from this week’s chat is now available!

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    #LTHEchat 175: Teaching as performance: performative aspects of teaching in higher education with guest host Dr Richard Bale @RichBale

    When you are teaching, to what extent do you feel like you are performing, acting, or entertaining your students? What inspiration might we draw from the skills and techniques of actors, singers, dancers, stand-up comedians, improv troupes, and other performing artists? These are some of the questions that we will explore in this LTHEchat.

    In some educational contexts and cultures, teaching as performance is well established as a way of thinking about the performative aspects of a teacher’s role. In North America, for example, colleagues seem accustomed to reflecting on their vulnerabilities as teachers, and on how their teaching role relates to the performer’s craft. See Sarah Rose Cavanagh’s piece All the Classroom’s a Stage for an illuminating reflection on this topic. 

    In the training of primary and secondary school teachers, there are often courses exploring the links between teaching and performance. During my own PGCE in Secondary Modern Languages, for example, we had input from actors and singers to help with confidence when speaking and presenting, and to practise breathing techniques and voice projection. This seems to be less the case in the higher education context, though some universities offer one-off sessions in performance as part of professional development for staff. In my previous role working with Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs), I developed a course called ‘Performative Aspects of Teaching’, in which participants explored their own feelings of ‘stage fright’ and aspects of their teaching performance. With yoga mats, breathing and relaxation exercises, and wacky activities inspired by acting and improvisation, this course provided a different way for participants – STEMM doctoral researchers – to think about their teaching role.

    I hope this LTHEchat will spark some interesting discussions, both from those who are sceptical of viewing teaching as performance as well as from those who have experience of applying creative, performative approaches to teaching in higher education.

    Photograph of Richard Bales

    Biography

    Richard Bale is a Senior Teaching Fellow in Educational Development at the Centre for Higher Education Research and Scholarship, Imperial College London, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (SFHEA). He has a PhD in corpus linguistics, translation and interpreting, and is the author of Teaching with Confidence in Higher Education: Applying Strategies from the Performing Arts.

    See the Wakelet for this chat: https://wakelet.com/wake/HVNo5hYk5-sfAuvOZjzWC

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    Quick link to Resources

    During our week long #LTHEchat 170 we invited you to share your ideas, information, links and planning in order to create a compendium of virtual resources.

    Our list has now merged with SEDA’s and is offered in the spirit of supporting teaching, learning and both the student and staff experience. The resources are not presented as ‘recommendations’, but as suggestions, with users best placed to select and adapt what works for them.

    The master list of resources can be found here.

    Aware of that the volume of resources available maybe somewhat overwhelming during #LTHEchat 173 we posed Question 5 to help curated the very best resources, pulling them together into a single space for ease of navigation.

    So if you are able please use the same link to add in your favourite ‘go to’ resources.

    Also to save you searching here are links to other spaces and places for the latest guidance, advice and support from @Seda_UK_, AdvanceHE and ALT

    …and as our tenure as #LTHEchat organisers comes to an end we would like to thank everyone for participating,

    @simonrae for the adorable images!,

    #virtualcoffee and #LTHEchat

    and all of our special guest hosts:

    Professor Sally Brown, Dr Vicki Dale, Professor Martin Weller, Dr Laura Gibbs, Simon Thomson, also special thanks to Sue Beckingham, Chris Jobling, Kay Hack and Chrissi Nerantzi for supporting us, and also Professor Peter Hartley, and all of our colleagues at SEDA, AdvanceHE and ALT.

    #staysafe and #stayhome

    Kindest regards and warmest wishes

    Dawne and Nathalie

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    Supporting colleagues in contingency planning for Coronavirus: Covid19: A Special Edition #LTHEchat (Chat 170)

    Hello from your #LTHEchat spring-semester curation team! @belld17 and @drnsheridan

    Bluebells

    Welcome to this very special #LTHEchat.

    Please may we begin by thanking our colleagues who have had ‘chat’s’ scheduled for sometime but have been flexible in re-arranging which has supported us in enabling this week long chat to occur. Especially Beverly Gibbs who has been so kind in giving up her session next week which has enabled us to make this happen. We cannot thank you enough.

    So, to explain a little bit about #LTHEchat 170.

    This special session arises as a result of numerous requests from colleagues seeking support in contingency planning and preparation in light of emerging developments related to Covid19.

    The Plan for the next 7 Days

    We began a special week long chat this evening (11th March). The rationale for this duration is that while ‘fast and frantic’ is wonderful, and we all learn so much every week, we believe that for this topic, with so many perspectives to consider and so much information to process an hour simply isn’t enough.

    Running for a full week will be able to gather detailed responses from each question posed. Also as the week progresses, theoretically having read someone else’s post, colleagues can go back and re-visit, adding to posts. From here we can pool our ideas, and in doing so create a wealth of information to share within and beyond the #LTHEchat community. Furthermore, running over a week will enable our International colleagues (who are perhaps unable to join us between 8-9 pm each evening) to participate. Enabling access to the very best information from across the sector globally. We will begin by posting a new question each day. 

    A new question will be posted at 8pm each day. We envisage there may well be activity each evening, but there is no requirement to join in only at 8pm, the questions are open and we would encourage colleagues to be active and share thoughts throughout the week. 

    Running alongside the #LTHEchat this week, we will facilitate a series of blog posts. So, if there is something you want to share please get in touch and we can arrange to share your perspective, contribution, resources, questions or ideas.

    Plan for the Week: An overview

    • Wednesday, 10th of March (9 pm GMT) live for 24 hours
      • Professor Sally Brown: Assessment. Please visit this link to view a document Sally has created and please feel free to comment, edit and share your thoughts: https://tinyurl.com/tjhjrwf
    • Thursday, 11th March (8 pm GMT) live for 24 hours
    • Friday, 10th of March (8 pm GMT) live for 24 hours
    • Saturday and Sunday: A weekend of resources
      • Beginning with resources provided by Professor Patrice Torcivia Prusko, Harvard Graduate School of Education, #LTHEchat invites you to share your resources and contingency plans. Share your resources here: https://tinyurl.com/w9txrq3
    • Monday, 16th March (8 pm GMT) live for 24 hours
    • Tuesday, 17th of March (8 pm GMT) live for 24 hours S
    • Wednesday 18th March 8-9 pm (GMT)
      • Consolidation. A review of the week hosted by #LTHEchat and #AdvanceHE_chat 
      • We are back on schedule as of tonight (18th March 2020) with a joined chat

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    #LTHEchat 174: Do Games Technologies Have a Place in Higher Education pedagogy? with guest host Dr Chris Headleand @ChrisHeadleand

    Intro: The technologies behind video games have been applied to a range of sectors. The playful nature of games combined with their intractability and aesthetic quality make them highly engaging. As such, serious games, and general gamification of content and process have become popular tools in many sectors. However, more recently people have been looking at applying the technologies of games more broadly to address challenges. Hosting conference calls in online role-playing games, or used building/sandbox games to teach basic mechanics. In many cases other (non games-based) software exists to tackle these issues, but occasionally the games platform provides additional benefits ranging from reliability to accessibility. In this LTHEChat we will discuss what, if any role Games-based technologies have to play in Higher Education.

    Chris Headleand

    Chris Headleand is an Associate Professor and the Director of Teaching and learning in the School of Computer Science at the University of Lincoln. His research interests include Virtual Reality, Artificial Intelligence, and Student Engagement, with a specific focus on to gaming applications and platforms. He graduated in 2009 with a degree in Design Education, a MSc in Computer Systems, a PGCHE, and a PhD in Computer Science from Bangor University. Beyond his Higher Education experience he has teaching experience, in the secondary and further education sectors, and he currently acts as a Governor for the Lincoln UTC. Chris has been exploring the use of video games in educational, and student engagement initiatives for 6 years.

    See the Wakelet for this chat: https://wke.lt/w/s/xnMbwc

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    So Long and Thanks for all the Fish

    Dawne and Nathalie want to say thank you everyone for joining us during our tenure running the LTHEchat in the first quarter of 2020! We had over 3700 blog visits in March and are delighted to have been able to support the community and help gather resources and encourage conversations during the beginnings of a global pandemic, the outcome and reach of which is yet to be determined.

    Colleagues and students alike have and are facing a complex multitude of challenges and we want to encourage you to stay connected, use the #virtualcoffee hashtag or revisit the resources on the blog here or visit the Wakelet in which we tried to curate some of the key resources.

    https://wke.lt/w/s/2zQwtd

    If you want to catch up on the Covid19 Special Edition chats and resources, please feel free to use this open Google Sheet. The LTHEchat community has shared not only their thoughts and debates but also many resources.

    https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1djqlKu7lLSyVFWT9uD954lBTy4dyWNWb-S5z4Fi2j6g/edit?usp=sharing

    If you want to explore the network of participation have a look the the special edition Tag Cloud here:

    And if you want to have a look about the reach of the LTHEchat, the following map depicts about 70% unique users (there were some issues with geo-coding so we did not manage to catch everyone)

    https://awesome-table.com/-M3WnPpu6cTyJgChDIBt/view

    Thank you everyone,

    Dawne and Nathalie

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    LTHEchat Easter-Egg

    The Image above is an interactive image, click on the yellow decorations and get links to fun stuff to do during your Easter Break.

    For accessibility the links are also listed below:

    Free Virtual Museum Tours and Exhibitions

    12 Virtual Museum Tours

    https://www.travelandleisure.com/attractions/museums-galleries/museums-with-virtual-tours

    Open Culture Article with various links to Chinese Museums that have gone online due to shut down

    http://www.openculture.com/2020/03/chinese-museums-closed-by-the-coronavirus-put-their-exhibitions-online.html

    Free Films and Audio

    Free 80s and 90s Pop Culture VHS recordings

    http://www.openculture.com/2020/03/the-vhs-vault.html

    Free Children and Young Adult Audiobooks during school shut down

    https://stories.audible.com/start-listen

    Free Collection or courses, books, and media on Open Culture

    http://www.openculture.com/2020/03/use-your-time-in-isolation-to-learn-everything-youve-always-wanted-to.html

    Historic Newsreel Films

    http://www.openculture.com/2020/03/watch-85000-historic-newsreel-films-from-british-pathe-free-online-1910-2008.html

    Charlie Chaplin Films

    http://www.openculture.com/2011/12/free_charlie_chaplin_films_on_the_web.html?fbclid=IwAR2lfDmuMRYNCnZRz33kQ551TTwx1ayzXWYgXHOSSdxBjNGYYXbiTBwXD8A

    Concerts and Plays Online

    MET streams live opera

    https://www.metopera.org/user-information/nightly-met-opera-streams/

    Globe London recorded Shakespeare Plays

    https://londonist.com/london/theatre-and-arts/globe-theatre-streaming-plays-online

    Arts and Crafts

    Free Museums Colouring Books

    http://www.openculture.com/2019/02/download-free-coloring-books-from-113-museums.html

    Mo Willems is teaching to draw on YouTube

    Free Books

    Guggenheim Free Art Books

    https://mymodernmet.com/guggenheim-museum-free-books-online/

    New York Public Library

    https://www.timeout.com/newyork/news/you-can-now-download-over-300-000-books-from-the-nypl-for-free-031820

    Free eBooks but also virtual objects and exhibitions

    https://www.timeout.com/newyork/news/you-can-now-download-over-300-000-books-from-the-nypl-for-free-031820

    Free libary Resources

    Recommendations from the LTHEchat Community

    Hope we found them all! Please keep adding as you find things into the comments below, and thank you everyone for their suggestions!

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    LTHEchat 173: Student and Staff Voices during a Pandemic and Online Pivot

    Student (and staff) Perspectives and Feedback on current arrangements for Learning and Teaching with @suebecks, @belld17 and @drnsheridan

    This is the last LTHEchat before the Easter Break and given the current circumstances of remote working, self-isolation, and online pivoting we collected the perspectives of students and staff experiencing this situation and created questions based on some of the key themes. We all hope that LTHEchat over the last weeks was able to offer you some support, resources and the feeling of belonging to an international community. And look forward to seeing you again after the Easter Holidays.

    Word Cloud of Themes, for details follow this link: https://wordart.com/5qagkfppll3n/word-art

    Wait!

    We are not letting you off into the break without a little bit of fun! For many of us the Easter Break, will very likely not be much of a break. To cheer you up and we have hidden a little Easter Egg in the questions. And will post an Easter Egg blog on Wednesday evening.

    Your LTHEchat team!

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    #LTHEchat 172: (How) Does assessment motivate students? with guest hosts Beverley Gibbs and Gary Wood

    (How) Does assessment motivate students?

    The concept of intrinsic motivation covers a number of ideas including students recognising that they are instrumental in their own success, believing in their own ability to succeed, and developing the deep personal interest that drives engagement and learning. It is accompanied by the hotly-debated idea that external rewards undermine the development of intrinsic motivation (Deci, Koestner & Ryan, 2001). This tweetchat invites the community to consider the ways in which summative assessment promotes or undermines intrinsic motivation.

    What is less arguable is that assessment has proliferated across higher education. Modularisation, and the compartmentalisation of learning it has encouraged, has contributed to this escalation. There are more assessment points, more assessment types, and more reasons for adding assessment. As its best, assessment provides feedback opportunities (formative assessment) or measures learning in the progress and conclusion of a unit of study (summative assessment). However, we also use it for more pragmatic purposes such as managing students’ behaviour: to make them read texts, complete risk assessments for practical work, use particular facilities, to turn up and engage – to name but a few.

    An important question, then, is what would happen if we stripped away assessments primarily to control behaviours? Is their only value to corral students with lower levels of intrinsic motivation to engage with study? To the extent that they achieve that aim, what detrimental impact do they have for the development of intrinsic motivation? Which students would thrive, and which would struggle, if we removed assessment for behaviour management, and what alternative scaffolding devices might help? Join us for this #LTHEchat to explore these questions, and share your experiences.

    Deci, E. L., Koestner, R., & Ryan, R. M. (2001). Extrinsic rewards and intrinsic motivation in education: Reconsidered once again. Review of educational research, 71(1), 1-27.

    Biographies

    Bev…

    Bev is Director of Learning and Teaching (Strategy) in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Sheffield where she looks after accreditation, pedagogy, curriculum and employability across the Department’s educational portfolio, and is Programme Director for 750 students on MEng and BEng Mechanical Engineering degrees. She is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy and has long-standing interests in student empowerment and in interdisciplinary learning. @bevgibbs

    Gary …

    Gary is a National Teaching Fellow and Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. He is Head of Sheffield Engineering Leadership Academy (SELA), an interdisciplinary, experiential development programme for high-potential undergraduate engineers, and University Teacher in Professional Skills, in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Sheffield. His work connects students’ learning to their career aspirations, with a focus on personalising their learning experience, and integrating learning through working on projects. He is passionate about student engagement in learning design, and the value of co-creation. @GC_Wood

    The Wakelet for this Session

    Coming soon…………….

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